So my fucking iPod crashed and I had to restore it and all my precious pictures are gone. I’ll be at Disneyland today, hopefully things get better.

10 hours ago   2   Reblog

Back on track [Mary and Bert]

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good
Mary looked up at him. He was right, although she hadn’t much noticed their difference in height, even with her nice pumps, Mary was a small bit shorter than Bert was.
She shrugged it off, although the idea that she hadn’t taken into account their heights was a small bit…

Bert pulled Mary’s hand up to kiss it, causing her to flush lightly. Bert was proving to be very good at that. She thought on the Jolly Holiday and how fun it would be to go on another before saying, “Wasn’t one session of serenades and teas enough?” Even though she smiled, it was small and sad. “Thank you”, she said in response to his compliments, “but I don’t think another Jolly Holiday would be a good idea”, she said, even though going with Bert to another far off location sounded fun to her. “It’s the- the children.”

Before Bert could even ask, Mary just sighed and shrugged. “It’s Cory and Liza. Funny Cory should share a name with our friend and Liza should share a name with your mother’s company. They really are lovely girls, but they lack something that I truly wish they didn’t. You see, the two of them lack a sense of wonder and excitement. While taking them out to shops like Mrs Corry’s amuses them, they aren’t much into the magical aspect of life. Their father, bless his soul, is sick, and the two of them have been dealing very much so with the real world. It’s been two years, and the man is very ill, with little hope left.” Mary’s voice began to leave her. “He was given a few months last year, and I haven’t seen any improvements since I arrived.” She said, thinking back to the girls.

"It’s sad really", she said. "You were telling me that I would be a good mother, and I’m afraid that that’s what Cordelia and Elizabeth want from me." Her voice was rueful and distant. "Their mother, I’m afraid, is quite lovely but she’s a little short-sighted." And for good measure, Mary tapped her nose to see if Bert understood her words. "She’s gone all the time, even with her sickly husband. Often times it’s just myself and them and Henry in the nursery, and sometimes it’s only us, with the exception of the father and his nurse, in the entire house. It’s a lovely place, but I’m afraid that it’s so empty and hollow."

And for the first time since Mary had been with the Price Family, she spoke of her fears for them. “Bert, I’m wearing a silver chain around my neck with a portrait in it. I wasn’t supposed to look inside, but I wanted to know what would happen to the family. I was worried, and I didn’t think I would have found anything unusual.” She began to look a little despaired at this point, and not for her efforts of unhooking the necklace. “Here”, she said as she pried open the locket, revealing the portrait that brought her so much worry.

Mary’s eyes watered a little as looked at the portrait, herself in the center with her charges around her. She first pointed to the left to the tall figure of a pale, brunette girl, with eyes like emeralds and skin like moonlight against her dark dress. She then pointed to another girl, shorter and to the right of Mary. The shorter girl had blonde hair, done in black bows, and fair skin. And Mary’s hand fell then. There was no one else to show.

A hollow laugh, much like the state the Price house was in most times sounded from Mary. “I shouldn’t have tempted fate, should I?” And then with another short laugh, which really wasn’t a laugh at all, she turned to the street again and closed her eyes. “To that awful butcher’s, and then straight to your mum’s house.” Her voice was void of the joy it was filled with when the two realized their love.

And she began to leave without even seeing if Bert was still with her.

They had stopped walking as Mary began to explain to him of the girls father Andy how he was sick and it wasn’t looking to good for him. It reminded Bert of his own father and how crushed him and his mother were when he died of sickness. He remembered how his mother couldn’t look at him without tearing up or crying, how she would distance herself and avoid him, the way how his old nanny SarahBelle was more of a mother to him than his own mother. His father was a good man and worked hard to make sure that after he died that him and his mother would be well off, enough so neither would have to work a day in their lives. Bert knew the pain those two girls were probably going through and he honestly felt for them, no one should have to go through that.

He stayed silent as she went on to tell him about their mother and how she was anything but that, and how they looked to Mary as a mother instead of their own. She wouldn’t look at him, and when she pulled out the locket and showed him the portrait he understood what she was saying. “Mary-” he mumbled before she began to walk off. He took a deep breath before following after her. He didn’t dare hold her hand for he didn’t want to push her the wrong way.

They had gotten to the butcher and as soon as they entered, the depressing looking man behind the counter instantly lightened up at the sight of Mary. “Miss Poppins!” Something within Bert became possessive over her and he instantly grabbed her hand into his own and smiled politely at the man. “What can I do for you today my dear?” Bert clenched his teeth at the pet name he called Mary. He let out a steady breath before looking to Mary. “You decide. Dear.” He said the last part between his teeth.

It was a surprise to Mary when Bert grabbed her hand. She looked down at it quickly before looking back up to see Bert, less than pleased. She stared from one side of the shop to another, as it wasn’t that large, and looked even smaller with the butcher in it. “I think I’ll take… one of those.” She said, using her free hand to point at a slab of pork. “A pork roast will be a nice treat for your mum, I should think. That and the potatoes with rosemary.” She finished, making a mental note of her menu plans.

"Bert", she whispered to him, trying to loosen his grip on her hand. It seemed a bit tight, and Bert seemed tense. She didn’t know for certain, but she guessed that Bert had a problem with the butcher, which Mary didn’t much blame him for. He was a pig at times.

The butcher worked quickly, even though he enjoyed the time when should would just stand in his shop, and had the order ready at once.

Before she could leave, he called out, “Are you sure that’s it?”, and Mary gave a curt nod and said yes. She took the shopping bag, and went to leave the shop, still remembering his even less appealing moods. And just as she was at the doors, she said a very quick, “Thank you for shopping with me, dear”, right when she was leaving from the butcher’s earshot.

"Bert", she began, turning the locket over in her hands, first face up, then down, "you told me early this morning that you could let me know how the children I leave are doing. Could you… could you tell me about the Banks Family?" She asked simply, as they made their way back through the winding streets to Mrs Alfred’s house.

Bert nodded at her before beginning to tell her of the Banks family. “Well their father and mother seem to ‘ave fallen in love all over again.” He smiled at the thought. “In fact they are expecting a baby, or twins from what the children tell me.” His voice grew soft yet serious. “They as about you all the time Mary. They always ask me if I know where you are, and if you’ll ever visit them, or if they’ll ever see you again.” He couldn’t quite read her expression for Mary was very skilled at hiding emotion. “They really love you Mary. And they knew you loved them like they were your own, they ‘aven’t forgotten you darling.” He reassured her. “Though their family is practically perfect as you left it, they all still love you.

Although she wasn’t immediately responding to the latest new of the Banks’, Mary listened with interest. They continued to speak of how much they loved her, even Mr Banks? Mr Banks who thought she was responsible for all the madness in his life? Well, Mary admitted to herself, she probably was.

"Thank you, Bert." She said as he finished. "If you would be so kind, tell Jane and Michael that I… I miss them too at times." She would have said more, but the Banks’ were better off without her entering their lives again. At least for long term.

"You know, I would like to see them again, but in the end, it’s better if they live their lives without me. They must face life without my help and do it all on their own." It was as if she were reading lines. She had often told Bert as much when it came to children inquiring about her.

Then she gave a soft laugh, less hollow than the one before, but still a little sad. “I saw them once. At the park with Henry. I saw them running with Mr Banks after a ball and quickly hid near the gate so Henry could continue to play nearby. Haven’t seen them since.” She admitted to him. “It wasn’t very long, and I didn’t even realize it was them at first. Just heard Michael shout for Jane, and I ran.” And at the thought, she gave a real laugh, forgetting for a moment, the Price Family and only picturing Michael’s face as he missed the toss his father sent for him.

"I don’t know anymore. I want very much to return for a day and take them on fantastical outings and to see my Uncle, but I know that that’s not practical. And even if it was just to say hello, they have a father and a mother. They don’t need me anymore, now that George and Winifred have fallen back together. But some days, I wish."

And right as she finished, they reached the familiar garden and front steps that Mary would now always associate with her Bert. 

Bert gave her hand a squeeze. “I will be more than ‘appy to tell them.” He smirked at the thought of Mary running from a child and hiding. “They don’t know the winds like I do Mary, the probably ‘ad no idea you were even there.” He told her with a sad smile. He figured that after years of coming and going it would finally be getting to her. They stopped in front of his mothers garden and he pulled both of her hands in his. “You can’t ‘ide from the emotion my dear, but I will always be ‘ere for those times when you just need to let everything out. I shan’t stand by and let you bottle things up.” He pressed a kiss to her forehead. “I love you to much Mary mine. To much to let you feel like this.” He gave her a reassuring smile. “Now, I believe we owe my mother dinner.”

With a smile, Mary pulled away. While it occurred to her that Bert may not want to listen to her long stories and confusing emotions, she felt safer knowing that her feelings wouldn’t die with her, so to speak. With a quick push on the handle, Mary Poppins had opened the door and swept herself inside.

"Alright then, Bert", she said as she pulled the starched apron of the hook in the kitchen and tied it around herself, "let’s serve your mother the best roast ever. It’s the very least we could do for being late."

With the same manner she used in the nurseries, Mary was a whirlwind through the kitchen, as if influenced by a very fast rhythm that Bert could not hear. Soon enough, everything was prepared, and only needed to finish cooking. Mary took a moment to hide the gingerbread box over the refrigerator, before turning to Bert and leaning in close.

Closer and closer she leaned until she took her hand, which had been ungloved since she had arrived at Mrs Alfred’s earlier in the day, and used it to pull Bert’s head closer still. And when they were practically nose to nose, Mary Poppins kissed his lips, giving him the slight taste of rosemary and lemon.

Bert was beaming by the time their noses were touching, his heart practically jumped in his chest as Mary pulled him in for a kiss. She tasted of the ingredients they had bought just earlier that evening. He threaded the fingers of one hand through her hair, as they kissed. After Mary pulled back just a bit, they stood there, noses still touching, and smiling brightly at each other. “I love you so much Mary.” He mumbled loud enough for her to hear him.

Mary pulled back and told him back, “I love you, too.” And then she wrapped her arms around him and stood for a moment, before pulling again and resting her head against his chest. She listened to his heart beat, and with and uncharacteristically naive look, snuggled against him.

It was odd, and Mary couldn’t describe it, but as soon as she rest her head on him, she felt a whole new level of calm envelope her. Her breathing slowed, and she was no longer a whirlwind doing everything quickly and efficiently. For now, she was just Mary, and she was leaning on none other than the sweetheart, Bert.

Bert wrapped his arms around her and held her close. She snuggled closer to him, causing a smirk to tug at his lips. She loved him too. Mary Poppins loved him. Bert felt warm inside at the thought before he snuggled closer to her and let out a content sigh before pressing a kiss to the top of her head. It was a simple gesture, but it meant the world to him. Mary could have chosen anyone, but she chose him. Bert tightens his grip ever so slightly and smiled softly, letting his eyes slip shut at the moment.

Mary began to move slightly in his arms. To the right, then the left, then right again. It was to the beat of his heart at first, and then it became faster. Mary smiled as another sensation filled her. “Bert”, she cooed slightly, waking him in a way. As kept her arms around him, and swayed lightly. She continued on, a little faster, and a little more each direction, until finally she realized what she had done.

The two were, in a way, dancing. On the tile floor clicked Mary’s heels as she shifted from one foot to the other. She began to hum one of her favorite of Bert’s songs ad the two swung lightly to a simple rhythm. Soon the tune was Chim Chim Cher-ee, and finally, when she hummed up to the part about the kiss, she gave him another one, this time, with more of a honey taste than rosemary.

Bert opened his eyes as she softly called his name. He smirked as he realized they were dancing in a way, not like the dancing they usually did, but much softer, almost gentle to the humming of Mary’s beautiful voice, and when she pressed a kiss to his lips again he let out a small laugh. “‘Ow is it that before you tasted of Rosemary and lemon, and now you taste as sweet as ‘oney?” He asked in a gentle tone, giving her a look that was nothing but loving as they continued their little dance. Bert hasn’t been this happy since the first time they met. “You are wonderful Mary mine, and I’m an incredibly luck man.” He laughed again before pressing a soft kiss to her lips.

19 hours ago   13   Reblog

Back on track [Mary and Bert]

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good
Mary looked up at him. He was right, although she hadn’t much noticed their difference in height, even with her nice pumps, Mary was a small bit shorter than Bert was.
She shrugged it off, although the idea that she hadn’t taken into account their heights was a small bit…

Bert pulled Mary’s hand up to kiss it, causing her to flush lightly. Bert was proving to be very good at that. She thought on the Jolly Holiday and how fun it would be to go on another before saying, “Wasn’t one session of serenades and teas enough?” Even though she smiled, it was small and sad. “Thank you”, she said in response to his compliments, “but I don’t think another Jolly Holiday would be a good idea”, she said, even though going with Bert to another far off location sounded fun to her. “It’s the- the children.”

Before Bert could even ask, Mary just sighed and shrugged. “It’s Cory and Liza. Funny Cory should share a name with our friend and Liza should share a name with your mother’s company. They really are lovely girls, but they lack something that I truly wish they didn’t. You see, the two of them lack a sense of wonder and excitement. While taking them out to shops like Mrs Corry’s amuses them, they aren’t much into the magical aspect of life. Their father, bless his soul, is sick, and the two of them have been dealing very much so with the real world. It’s been two years, and the man is very ill, with little hope left.” Mary’s voice began to leave her. “He was given a few months last year, and I haven’t seen any improvements since I arrived.” She said, thinking back to the girls.

"It’s sad really", she said. "You were telling me that I would be a good mother, and I’m afraid that that’s what Cordelia and Elizabeth want from me." Her voice was rueful and distant. "Their mother, I’m afraid, is quite lovely but she’s a little short-sighted." And for good measure, Mary tapped her nose to see if Bert understood her words. "She’s gone all the time, even with her sickly husband. Often times it’s just myself and them and Henry in the nursery, and sometimes it’s only us, with the exception of the father and his nurse, in the entire house. It’s a lovely place, but I’m afraid that it’s so empty and hollow."

And for the first time since Mary had been with the Price Family, she spoke of her fears for them. “Bert, I’m wearing a silver chain around my neck with a portrait in it. I wasn’t supposed to look inside, but I wanted to know what would happen to the family. I was worried, and I didn’t think I would have found anything unusual.” She began to look a little despaired at this point, and not for her efforts of unhooking the necklace. “Here”, she said as she pried open the locket, revealing the portrait that brought her so much worry.

Mary’s eyes watered a little as looked at the portrait, herself in the center with her charges around her. She first pointed to the left to the tall figure of a pale, brunette girl, with eyes like emeralds and skin like moonlight against her dark dress. She then pointed to another girl, shorter and to the right of Mary. The shorter girl had blonde hair, done in black bows, and fair skin. And Mary’s hand fell then. There was no one else to show.

A hollow laugh, much like the state the Price house was in most times sounded from Mary. “I shouldn’t have tempted fate, should I?” And then with another short laugh, which really wasn’t a laugh at all, she turned to the street again and closed her eyes. “To that awful butcher’s, and then straight to your mum’s house.” Her voice was void of the joy it was filled with when the two realized their love.

And she began to leave without even seeing if Bert was still with her.

They had stopped walking as Mary began to explain to him of the girls father Andy how he was sick and it wasn’t looking to good for him. It reminded Bert of his own father and how crushed him and his mother were when he died of sickness. He remembered how his mother couldn’t look at him without tearing up or crying, how she would distance herself and avoid him, the way how his old nanny SarahBelle was more of a mother to him than his own mother. His father was a good man and worked hard to make sure that after he died that him and his mother would be well off, enough so neither would have to work a day in their lives. Bert knew the pain those two girls were probably going through and he honestly felt for them, no one should have to go through that.

He stayed silent as she went on to tell him about their mother and how she was anything but that, and how they looked to Mary as a mother instead of their own. She wouldn’t look at him, and when she pulled out the locket and showed him the portrait he understood what she was saying. “Mary-” he mumbled before she began to walk off. He took a deep breath before following after her. He didn’t dare hold her hand for he didn’t want to push her the wrong way.

They had gotten to the butcher and as soon as they entered, the depressing looking man behind the counter instantly lightened up at the sight of Mary. “Miss Poppins!” Something within Bert became possessive over her and he instantly grabbed her hand into his own and smiled politely at the man. “What can I do for you today my dear?” Bert clenched his teeth at the pet name he called Mary. He let out a steady breath before looking to Mary. “You decide. Dear.” He said the last part between his teeth.

It was a surprise to Mary when Bert grabbed her hand. She looked down at it quickly before looking back up to see Bert, less than pleased. She stared from one side of the shop to another, as it wasn’t that large, and looked even smaller with the butcher in it. “I think I’ll take… one of those.” She said, using her free hand to point at a slab of pork. “A pork roast will be a nice treat for your mum, I should think. That and the potatoes with rosemary.” She finished, making a mental note of her menu plans.

"Bert", she whispered to him, trying to loosen his grip on her hand. It seemed a bit tight, and Bert seemed tense. She didn’t know for certain, but she guessed that Bert had a problem with the butcher, which Mary didn’t much blame him for. He was a pig at times.

The butcher worked quickly, even though he enjoyed the time when should would just stand in his shop, and had the order ready at once.

Before she could leave, he called out, “Are you sure that’s it?”, and Mary gave a curt nod and said yes. She took the shopping bag, and went to leave the shop, still remembering his even less appealing moods. And just as she was at the doors, she said a very quick, “Thank you for shopping with me, dear”, right when she was leaving from the butcher’s earshot.

"Bert", she began, turning the locket over in her hands, first face up, then down, "you told me early this morning that you could let me know how the children I leave are doing. Could you… could you tell me about the Banks Family?" She asked simply, as they made their way back through the winding streets to Mrs Alfred’s house.

Bert nodded at her before beginning to tell her of the Banks family. “Well their father and mother seem to ‘ave fallen in love all over again.” He smiled at the thought. “In fact they are expecting a baby, or twins from what the children tell me.” His voice grew soft yet serious. “They as about you all the time Mary. They always ask me if I know where you are, and if you’ll ever visit them, or if they’ll ever see you again.” He couldn’t quite read her expression for Mary was very skilled at hiding emotion. “They really love you Mary. And they knew you loved them like they were your own, they ‘aven’t forgotten you darling.” He reassured her. “Though their family is practically perfect as you left it, they all still love you.

Although she wasn’t immediately responding to the latest new of the Banks’, Mary listened with interest. They continued to speak of how much they loved her, even Mr Banks? Mr Banks who thought she was responsible for all the madness in his life? Well, Mary admitted to herself, she probably was.

"Thank you, Bert." She said as he finished. "If you would be so kind, tell Jane and Michael that I… I miss them too at times." She would have said more, but the Banks’ were better off without her entering their lives again. At least for long term.

"You know, I would like to see them again, but in the end, it’s better if they live their lives without me. They must face life without my help and do it all on their own." It was as if she were reading lines. She had often told Bert as much when it came to children inquiring about her.

Then she gave a soft laugh, less hollow than the one before, but still a little sad. “I saw them once. At the park with Henry. I saw them running with Mr Banks after a ball and quickly hid near the gate so Henry could continue to play nearby. Haven’t seen them since.” She admitted to him. “It wasn’t very long, and I didn’t even realize it was them at first. Just heard Michael shout for Jane, and I ran.” And at the thought, she gave a real laugh, forgetting for a moment, the Price Family and only picturing Michael’s face as he missed the toss his father sent for him.

"I don’t know anymore. I want very much to return for a day and take them on fantastical outings and to see my Uncle, but I know that that’s not practical. And even if it was just to say hello, they have a father and a mother. They don’t need me anymore, now that George and Winifred have fallen back together. But some days, I wish."

And right as she finished, they reached the familiar garden and front steps that Mary would now always associate with her Bert. 

Bert gave her hand a squeeze. “I will be more than ‘appy to tell them.” He smirked at the thought of Mary running from a child and hiding. “They don’t know the winds like I do Mary, the probably ‘ad no idea you were even there.” He told her with a sad smile. He figured that after years of coming and going it would finally be getting to her. They stopped in front of his mothers garden and he pulled both of her hands in his. “You can’t ‘ide from the emotion my dear, but I will always be ‘ere for those times when you just need to let everything out. I shan’t stand by and let you bottle things up.” He pressed a kiss to her forehead. “I love you to much Mary mine. To much to let you feel like this.” He gave her a reassuring smile. “Now, I believe we owe my mother dinner.”

With a smile, Mary pulled away. While it occurred to her that Bert may not want to listen to her long stories and confusing emotions, she felt safer knowing that her feelings wouldn’t die with her, so to speak. With a quick push on the handle, Mary Poppins had opened the door and swept herself inside.

"Alright then, Bert", she said as she pulled the starched apron of the hook in the kitchen and tied it around herself, "let’s serve your mother the best roast ever. It’s the very least we could do for being late."

With the same manner she used in the nurseries, Mary was a whirlwind through the kitchen, as if influenced by a very fast rhythm that Bert could not hear. Soon enough, everything was prepared, and only needed to finish cooking. Mary took a moment to hide the gingerbread box over the refrigerator, before turning to Bert and leaning in close.

Closer and closer she leaned until she took her hand, which had been ungloved since she had arrived at Mrs Alfred’s earlier in the day, and used it to pull Bert’s head closer still. And when they were practically nose to nose, Mary Poppins kissed his lips, giving him the slight taste of rosemary and lemon.

Bert was beaming by the time their noses were touching, his heart practically jumped in his chest as Mary pulled him in for a kiss. She tasted of the ingredients they had bought just earlier that evening. He threaded the fingers of one hand through her hair, as they kissed. After Mary pulled back just a bit, they stood there, noses still touching, and smiling brightly at each other. “I love you so much Mary.” He mumbled loud enough for her to hear him.

Mary pulled back and told him back, “I love you, too.” And then she wrapped her arms around him and stood for a moment, before pulling again and resting her head against his chest. She listened to his heart beat, and with and uncharacteristically naive look, snuggled against him.

It was odd, and Mary couldn’t describe it, but as soon as she rest her head on him, she felt a whole new level of calm envelope her. Her breathing slowed, and she was no longer a whirlwind doing everything quickly and efficiently. For now, she was just Mary, and she was leaning on none other than the sweetheart, Bert.

Bert wrapped his arms around her and held her close. She snuggled closer to him, causing a smirk to tug at his lips. She loved him too. Mary Poppins loved him. Bert felt warm inside at the thought before he snuggled closer to her and let out a content sigh before pressing a kiss to the top of her head. It was a simple gesture, but it meant the world to him. Mary could have chosen anyone, but she chose him. Bert tightens his grip ever so slightly and smiled softly, letting his eyes slip shut at the moment.

19 hours ago   13   Reblog

Back on track [Mary and Bert]

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good
Mary looked up at him. He was right, although she hadn’t much noticed their difference in height, even with her nice pumps, Mary was a small bit shorter than Bert was.
She shrugged it off, although the idea that she hadn’t taken into account their heights was a small bit…

Bert pulled Mary’s hand up to kiss it, causing her to flush lightly. Bert was proving to be very good at that. She thought on the Jolly Holiday and how fun it would be to go on another before saying, “Wasn’t one session of serenades and teas enough?” Even though she smiled, it was small and sad. “Thank you”, she said in response to his compliments, “but I don’t think another Jolly Holiday would be a good idea”, she said, even though going with Bert to another far off location sounded fun to her. “It’s the- the children.”

Before Bert could even ask, Mary just sighed and shrugged. “It’s Cory and Liza. Funny Cory should share a name with our friend and Liza should share a name with your mother’s company. They really are lovely girls, but they lack something that I truly wish they didn’t. You see, the two of them lack a sense of wonder and excitement. While taking them out to shops like Mrs Corry’s amuses them, they aren’t much into the magical aspect of life. Their father, bless his soul, is sick, and the two of them have been dealing very much so with the real world. It’s been two years, and the man is very ill, with little hope left.” Mary’s voice began to leave her. “He was given a few months last year, and I haven’t seen any improvements since I arrived.” She said, thinking back to the girls.

"It’s sad really", she said. "You were telling me that I would be a good mother, and I’m afraid that that’s what Cordelia and Elizabeth want from me." Her voice was rueful and distant. "Their mother, I’m afraid, is quite lovely but she’s a little short-sighted." And for good measure, Mary tapped her nose to see if Bert understood her words. "She’s gone all the time, even with her sickly husband. Often times it’s just myself and them and Henry in the nursery, and sometimes it’s only us, with the exception of the father and his nurse, in the entire house. It’s a lovely place, but I’m afraid that it’s so empty and hollow."

And for the first time since Mary had been with the Price Family, she spoke of her fears for them. “Bert, I’m wearing a silver chain around my neck with a portrait in it. I wasn’t supposed to look inside, but I wanted to know what would happen to the family. I was worried, and I didn’t think I would have found anything unusual.” She began to look a little despaired at this point, and not for her efforts of unhooking the necklace. “Here”, she said as she pried open the locket, revealing the portrait that brought her so much worry.

Mary’s eyes watered a little as looked at the portrait, herself in the center with her charges around her. She first pointed to the left to the tall figure of a pale, brunette girl, with eyes like emeralds and skin like moonlight against her dark dress. She then pointed to another girl, shorter and to the right of Mary. The shorter girl had blonde hair, done in black bows, and fair skin. And Mary’s hand fell then. There was no one else to show.

A hollow laugh, much like the state the Price house was in most times sounded from Mary. “I shouldn’t have tempted fate, should I?” And then with another short laugh, which really wasn’t a laugh at all, she turned to the street again and closed her eyes. “To that awful butcher’s, and then straight to your mum’s house.” Her voice was void of the joy it was filled with when the two realized their love.

And she began to leave without even seeing if Bert was still with her.

They had stopped walking as Mary began to explain to him of the girls father Andy how he was sick and it wasn’t looking to good for him. It reminded Bert of his own father and how crushed him and his mother were when he died of sickness. He remembered how his mother couldn’t look at him without tearing up or crying, how she would distance herself and avoid him, the way how his old nanny SarahBelle was more of a mother to him than his own mother. His father was a good man and worked hard to make sure that after he died that him and his mother would be well off, enough so neither would have to work a day in their lives. Bert knew the pain those two girls were probably going through and he honestly felt for them, no one should have to go through that.

He stayed silent as she went on to tell him about their mother and how she was anything but that, and how they looked to Mary as a mother instead of their own. She wouldn’t look at him, and when she pulled out the locket and showed him the portrait he understood what she was saying. “Mary-” he mumbled before she began to walk off. He took a deep breath before following after her. He didn’t dare hold her hand for he didn’t want to push her the wrong way.

They had gotten to the butcher and as soon as they entered, the depressing looking man behind the counter instantly lightened up at the sight of Mary. “Miss Poppins!” Something within Bert became possessive over her and he instantly grabbed her hand into his own and smiled politely at the man. “What can I do for you today my dear?” Bert clenched his teeth at the pet name he called Mary. He let out a steady breath before looking to Mary. “You decide. Dear.” He said the last part between his teeth.

It was a surprise to Mary when Bert grabbed her hand. She looked down at it quickly before looking back up to see Bert, less than pleased. She stared from one side of the shop to another, as it wasn’t that large, and looked even smaller with the butcher in it. “I think I’ll take… one of those.” She said, using her free hand to point at a slab of pork. “A pork roast will be a nice treat for your mum, I should think. That and the potatoes with rosemary.” She finished, making a mental note of her menu plans.

"Bert", she whispered to him, trying to loosen his grip on her hand. It seemed a bit tight, and Bert seemed tense. She didn’t know for certain, but she guessed that Bert had a problem with the butcher, which Mary didn’t much blame him for. He was a pig at times.

The butcher worked quickly, even though he enjoyed the time when should would just stand in his shop, and had the order ready at once.

Before she could leave, he called out, “Are you sure that’s it?”, and Mary gave a curt nod and said yes. She took the shopping bag, and went to leave the shop, still remembering his even less appealing moods. And just as she was at the doors, she said a very quick, “Thank you for shopping with me, dear”, right when she was leaving from the butcher’s earshot.

"Bert", she began, turning the locket over in her hands, first face up, then down, "you told me early this morning that you could let me know how the children I leave are doing. Could you… could you tell me about the Banks Family?" She asked simply, as they made their way back through the winding streets to Mrs Alfred’s house.

Bert nodded at her before beginning to tell her of the Banks family. “Well their father and mother seem to ‘ave fallen in love all over again.” He smiled at the thought. “In fact they are expecting a baby, or twins from what the children tell me.” His voice grew soft yet serious. “They as about you all the time Mary. They always ask me if I know where you are, and if you’ll ever visit them, or if they’ll ever see you again.” He couldn’t quite read her expression for Mary was very skilled at hiding emotion. “They really love you Mary. And they knew you loved them like they were your own, they ‘aven’t forgotten you darling.” He reassured her. “Though their family is practically perfect as you left it, they all still love you.

Although she wasn’t immediately responding to the latest new of the Banks’, Mary listened with interest. They continued to speak of how much they loved her, even Mr Banks? Mr Banks who thought she was responsible for all the madness in his life? Well, Mary admitted to herself, she probably was.

"Thank you, Bert." She said as he finished. "If you would be so kind, tell Jane and Michael that I… I miss them too at times." She would have said more, but the Banks’ were better off without her entering their lives again. At least for long term.

"You know, I would like to see them again, but in the end, it’s better if they live their lives without me. They must face life without my help and do it all on their own." It was as if she were reading lines. She had often told Bert as much when it came to children inquiring about her.

Then she gave a soft laugh, less hollow than the one before, but still a little sad. “I saw them once. At the park with Henry. I saw them running with Mr Banks after a ball and quickly hid near the gate so Henry could continue to play nearby. Haven’t seen them since.” She admitted to him. “It wasn’t very long, and I didn’t even realize it was them at first. Just heard Michael shout for Jane, and I ran.” And at the thought, she gave a real laugh, forgetting for a moment, the Price Family and only picturing Michael’s face as he missed the toss his father sent for him.

"I don’t know anymore. I want very much to return for a day and take them on fantastical outings and to see my Uncle, but I know that that’s not practical. And even if it was just to say hello, they have a father and a mother. They don’t need me anymore, now that George and Winifred have fallen back together. But some days, I wish."

And right as she finished, they reached the familiar garden and front steps that Mary would now always associate with her Bert. 

Bert gave her hand a squeeze. “I will be more than ‘appy to tell them.” He smirked at the thought of Mary running from a child and hiding. “They don’t know the winds like I do Mary, the probably ‘ad no idea you were even there.” He told her with a sad smile. He figured that after years of coming and going it would finally be getting to her. They stopped in front of his mothers garden and he pulled both of her hands in his. “You can’t ‘ide from the emotion my dear, but I will always be ‘ere for those times when you just need to let everything out. I shan’t stand by and let you bottle things up.” He pressed a kiss to her forehead. “I love you to much Mary mine. To much to let you feel like this.” He gave her a reassuring smile. “Now, I believe we owe my mother dinner.”

With a smile, Mary pulled away. While it occurred to her that Bert may not want to listen to her long stories and confusing emotions, she felt safer knowing that her feelings wouldn’t die with her, so to speak. With a quick push on the handle, Mary Poppins had opened the door and swept herself inside.

"Alright then, Bert", she said as she pulled the starched apron of the hook in the kitchen and tied it around herself, "let’s serve your mother the best roast ever. It’s the very least we could do for being late."

With the same manner she used in the nurseries, Mary was a whirlwind through the kitchen, as if influenced by a very fast rhythm that Bert could not hear. Soon enough, everything was prepared, and only needed to finish cooking. Mary took a moment to hide the gingerbread box over the refrigerator, before turning to Bert and leaning in close.

Closer and closer she leaned until she took her hand, which had been ungloved since she had arrived at Mrs Alfred’s earlier in the day, and used it to pull Bert’s head closer still. And when they were practically nose to nose, Mary Poppins kissed his lips, giving him the slight taste of rosemary and lemon.

Bert was beaming by the time their noses were touching, his heart practically jumped in his chest as Mary pulled him in for a kiss. She tasted of the ingredients they had bought just earlier that evening. He threaded the fingers of one hand through her hair, as they kissed. After Mary pulled back just a bit, they stood there, noses still touching, and smiling brightly at each other. “I love you so much Mary.” He mumbled loud enough for her to hear him.

19 hours ago   13   Reblog

WHAT TUMBLR USER DO U SHIP ME WITH

20 hours ago   221145   Reblog

Back on track [Mary and Bert]

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good
Mary looked up at him. He was right, although she hadn’t much noticed their difference in height, even with her nice pumps, Mary was a small bit shorter than Bert was.
She shrugged it off, although the idea that she hadn’t taken into account their heights was a small bit…

Bert pulled Mary’s hand up to kiss it, causing her to flush lightly. Bert was proving to be very good at that. She thought on the Jolly Holiday and how fun it would be to go on another before saying, “Wasn’t one session of serenades and teas enough?” Even though she smiled, it was small and sad. “Thank you”, she said in response to his compliments, “but I don’t think another Jolly Holiday would be a good idea”, she said, even though going with Bert to another far off location sounded fun to her. “It’s the- the children.”

Before Bert could even ask, Mary just sighed and shrugged. “It’s Cory and Liza. Funny Cory should share a name with our friend and Liza should share a name with your mother’s company. They really are lovely girls, but they lack something that I truly wish they didn’t. You see, the two of them lack a sense of wonder and excitement. While taking them out to shops like Mrs Corry’s amuses them, they aren’t much into the magical aspect of life. Their father, bless his soul, is sick, and the two of them have been dealing very much so with the real world. It’s been two years, and the man is very ill, with little hope left.” Mary’s voice began to leave her. “He was given a few months last year, and I haven’t seen any improvements since I arrived.” She said, thinking back to the girls.

"It’s sad really", she said. "You were telling me that I would be a good mother, and I’m afraid that that’s what Cordelia and Elizabeth want from me." Her voice was rueful and distant. "Their mother, I’m afraid, is quite lovely but she’s a little short-sighted." And for good measure, Mary tapped her nose to see if Bert understood her words. "She’s gone all the time, even with her sickly husband. Often times it’s just myself and them and Henry in the nursery, and sometimes it’s only us, with the exception of the father and his nurse, in the entire house. It’s a lovely place, but I’m afraid that it’s so empty and hollow."

And for the first time since Mary had been with the Price Family, she spoke of her fears for them. “Bert, I’m wearing a silver chain around my neck with a portrait in it. I wasn’t supposed to look inside, but I wanted to know what would happen to the family. I was worried, and I didn’t think I would have found anything unusual.” She began to look a little despaired at this point, and not for her efforts of unhooking the necklace. “Here”, she said as she pried open the locket, revealing the portrait that brought her so much worry.

Mary’s eyes watered a little as looked at the portrait, herself in the center with her charges around her. She first pointed to the left to the tall figure of a pale, brunette girl, with eyes like emeralds and skin like moonlight against her dark dress. She then pointed to another girl, shorter and to the right of Mary. The shorter girl had blonde hair, done in black bows, and fair skin. And Mary’s hand fell then. There was no one else to show.

A hollow laugh, much like the state the Price house was in most times sounded from Mary. “I shouldn’t have tempted fate, should I?” And then with another short laugh, which really wasn’t a laugh at all, she turned to the street again and closed her eyes. “To that awful butcher’s, and then straight to your mum’s house.” Her voice was void of the joy it was filled with when the two realized their love.

And she began to leave without even seeing if Bert was still with her.

They had stopped walking as Mary began to explain to him of the girls father Andy how he was sick and it wasn’t looking to good for him. It reminded Bert of his own father and how crushed him and his mother were when he died of sickness. He remembered how his mother couldn’t look at him without tearing up or crying, how she would distance herself and avoid him, the way how his old nanny SarahBelle was more of a mother to him than his own mother. His father was a good man and worked hard to make sure that after he died that him and his mother would be well off, enough so neither would have to work a day in their lives. Bert knew the pain those two girls were probably going through and he honestly felt for them, no one should have to go through that.

He stayed silent as she went on to tell him about their mother and how she was anything but that, and how they looked to Mary as a mother instead of their own. She wouldn’t look at him, and when she pulled out the locket and showed him the portrait he understood what she was saying. “Mary-” he mumbled before she began to walk off. He took a deep breath before following after her. He didn’t dare hold her hand for he didn’t want to push her the wrong way.

They had gotten to the butcher and as soon as they entered, the depressing looking man behind the counter instantly lightened up at the sight of Mary. “Miss Poppins!” Something within Bert became possessive over her and he instantly grabbed her hand into his own and smiled politely at the man. “What can I do for you today my dear?” Bert clenched his teeth at the pet name he called Mary. He let out a steady breath before looking to Mary. “You decide. Dear.” He said the last part between his teeth.

It was a surprise to Mary when Bert grabbed her hand. She looked down at it quickly before looking back up to see Bert, less than pleased. She stared from one side of the shop to another, as it wasn’t that large, and looked even smaller with the butcher in it. “I think I’ll take… one of those.” She said, using her free hand to point at a slab of pork. “A pork roast will be a nice treat for your mum, I should think. That and the potatoes with rosemary.” She finished, making a mental note of her menu plans.

"Bert", she whispered to him, trying to loosen his grip on her hand. It seemed a bit tight, and Bert seemed tense. She didn’t know for certain, but she guessed that Bert had a problem with the butcher, which Mary didn’t much blame him for. He was a pig at times.

The butcher worked quickly, even though he enjoyed the time when should would just stand in his shop, and had the order ready at once.

Before she could leave, he called out, “Are you sure that’s it?”, and Mary gave a curt nod and said yes. She took the shopping bag, and went to leave the shop, still remembering his even less appealing moods. And just as she was at the doors, she said a very quick, “Thank you for shopping with me, dear”, right when she was leaving from the butcher’s earshot.

"Bert", she began, turning the locket over in her hands, first face up, then down, "you told me early this morning that you could let me know how the children I leave are doing. Could you… could you tell me about the Banks Family?" She asked simply, as they made their way back through the winding streets to Mrs Alfred’s house.

Bert nodded at her before beginning to tell her of the Banks family. “Well their father and mother seem to ‘ave fallen in love all over again.” He smiled at the thought. “In fact they are expecting a baby, or twins from what the children tell me.” His voice grew soft yet serious. “They as about you all the time Mary. They always ask me if I know where you are, and if you’ll ever visit them, or if they’ll ever see you again.” He couldn’t quite read her expression for Mary was very skilled at hiding emotion. “They really love you Mary. And they knew you loved them like they were your own, they ‘aven’t forgotten you darling.” He reassured her. “Though their family is practically perfect as you left it, they all still love you.

Although she wasn’t immediately responding to the latest new of the Banks’, Mary listened with interest. They continued to speak of how much they loved her, even Mr Banks? Mr Banks who thought she was responsible for all the madness in his life? Well, Mary admitted to herself, she probably was.

"Thank you, Bert." She said as he finished. "If you would be so kind, tell Jane and Michael that I… I miss them too at times." She would have said more, but the Banks’ were better off without her entering their lives again. At least for long term.

"You know, I would like to see them again, but in the end, it’s better if they live their lives without me. They must face life without my help and do it all on their own." It was as if she were reading lines. She had often told Bert as much when it came to children inquiring about her.

Then she gave a soft laugh, less hollow than the one before, but still a little sad. “I saw them once. At the park with Henry. I saw them running with Mr Banks after a ball and quickly hid near the gate so Henry could continue to play nearby. Haven’t seen them since.” She admitted to him. “It wasn’t very long, and I didn’t even realize it was them at first. Just heard Michael shout for Jane, and I ran.” And at the thought, she gave a real laugh, forgetting for a moment, the Price Family and only picturing Michael’s face as he missed the toss his father sent for him.

"I don’t know anymore. I want very much to return for a day and take them on fantastical outings and to see my Uncle, but I know that that’s not practical. And even if it was just to say hello, they have a father and a mother. They don’t need me anymore, now that George and Winifred have fallen back together. But some days, I wish."

And right as she finished, they reached the familiar garden and front steps that Mary would now always associate with her Bert. 

Bert gave her hand a squeeze. “I will be more than ‘appy to tell them.” He smirked at the thought of Mary running from a child and hiding. “They don’t know the winds like I do Mary, the probably ‘ad no idea you were even there.” He told her with a sad smile. He figured that after years of coming and going it would finally be getting to her. They stopped in front of his mothers garden and he pulled both of her hands in his. “You can’t ‘ide from the emotion my dear, but I will always be ‘ere for those times when you just need to let everything out. I shan’t stand by and let you bottle things up.” He pressed a kiss to her forehead. “I love you to much Mary mine. To much to let you feel like this.” He gave her a reassuring smile. “Now, I believe we owe my mother dinner.”

20 hours ago   13   Reblog

.

20 hours ago   0   Reblog

Send me a symbol and I’ll tell you how to…

rpmememaker:

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  • ツ - make my muse laugh/smile
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20 hours ago   9744   Reblog

Back on track [Mary and Bert]

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good:

mr-bert-alfred123:

tricky-but-very-good
Mary looked up at him. He was right, although she hadn’t much noticed their difference in height, even with her nice pumps, Mary was a small bit shorter than Bert was.
She shrugged it off, although the idea that she hadn’t taken into account their heights was a small bit…

Bert pulled Mary’s hand up to kiss it, causing her to flush lightly. Bert was proving to be very good at that. She thought on the Jolly Holiday and how fun it would be to go on another before saying, “Wasn’t one session of serenades and teas enough?” Even though she smiled, it was small and sad. “Thank you”, she said in response to his compliments, “but I don’t think another Jolly Holiday would be a good idea”, she said, even though going with Bert to another far off location sounded fun to her. “It’s the- the children.”

Before Bert could even ask, Mary just sighed and shrugged. “It’s Cory and Liza. Funny Cory should share a name with our friend and Liza should share a name with your mother’s company. They really are lovely girls, but they lack something that I truly wish they didn’t. You see, the two of them lack a sense of wonder and excitement. While taking them out to shops like Mrs Corry’s amuses them, they aren’t much into the magical aspect of life. Their father, bless his soul, is sick, and the two of them have been dealing very much so with the real world. It’s been two years, and the man is very ill, with little hope left.” Mary’s voice began to leave her. “He was given a few months last year, and I haven’t seen any improvements since I arrived.” She said, thinking back to the girls.

"It’s sad really", she said. "You were telling me that I would be a good mother, and I’m afraid that that’s what Cordelia and Elizabeth want from me." Her voice was rueful and distant. "Their mother, I’m afraid, is quite lovely but she’s a little short-sighted." And for good measure, Mary tapped her nose to see if Bert understood her words. "She’s gone all the time, even with her sickly husband. Often times it’s just myself and them and Henry in the nursery, and sometimes it’s only us, with the exception of the father and his nurse, in the entire house. It’s a lovely place, but I’m afraid that it’s so empty and hollow."

And for the first time since Mary had been with the Price Family, she spoke of her fears for them. “Bert, I’m wearing a silver chain around my neck with a portrait in it. I wasn’t supposed to look inside, but I wanted to know what would happen to the family. I was worried, and I didn’t think I would have found anything unusual.” She began to look a little despaired at this point, and not for her efforts of unhooking the necklace. “Here”, she said as she pried open the locket, revealing the portrait that brought her so much worry.

Mary’s eyes watered a little as looked at the portrait, herself in the center with her charges around her. She first pointed to the left to the tall figure of a pale, brunette girl, with eyes like emeralds and skin like moonlight against her dark dress. She then pointed to another girl, shorter and to the right of Mary. The shorter girl had blonde hair, done in black bows, and fair skin. And Mary’s hand fell then. There was no one else to show.

A hollow laugh, much like the state the Price house was in most times sounded from Mary. “I shouldn’t have tempted fate, should I?” And then with another short laugh, which really wasn’t a laugh at all, she turned to the street again and closed her eyes. “To that awful butcher’s, and then straight to your mum’s house.” Her voice was void of the joy it was filled with when the two realized their love.

And she began to leave without even seeing if Bert was still with her.

They had stopped walking as Mary began to explain to him of the girls father Andy how he was sick and it wasn’t looking to good for him. It reminded Bert of his own father and how crushed him and his mother were when he died of sickness. He remembered how his mother couldn’t look at him without tearing up or crying, how she would distance herself and avoid him, the way how his old nanny SarahBelle was more of a mother to him than his own mother. His father was a good man and worked hard to make sure that after he died that him and his mother would be well off, enough so neither would have to work a day in their lives. Bert knew the pain those two girls were probably going through and he honestly felt for them, no one should have to go through that.

He stayed silent as she went on to tell him about their mother and how she was anything but that, and how they looked to Mary as a mother instead of their own. She wouldn’t look at him, and when she pulled out the locket and showed him the portrait he understood what she was saying. “Mary-” he mumbled before she began to walk off. He took a deep breath before following after her. He didn’t dare hold her hand for he didn’t want to push her the wrong way.

They had gotten to the butcher and as soon as they entered, the depressing looking man behind the counter instantly lightened up at the sight of Mary. “Miss Poppins!” Something within Bert became possessive over her and he instantly grabbed her hand into his own and smiled politely at the man. “What can I do for you today my dear?” Bert clenched his teeth at the pet name he called Mary. He let out a steady breath before looking to Mary. “You decide. Dear.” He said the last part between his teeth.

It was a surprise to Mary when Bert grabbed her hand. She looked down at it quickly before looking back up to see Bert, less than pleased. She stared from one side of the shop to another, as it wasn’t that large, and looked even smaller with the butcher in it. “I think I’ll take… one of those.” She said, using her free hand to point at a slab of pork. “A pork roast will be a nice treat for your mum, I should think. That and the potatoes with rosemary.” She finished, making a mental note of her menu plans.

"Bert", she whispered to him, trying to loosen his grip on her hand. It seemed a bit tight, and Bert seemed tense. She didn’t know for certain, but she guessed that Bert had a problem with the butcher, which Mary didn’t much blame him for. He was a pig at times.

The butcher worked quickly, even though he enjoyed the time when should would just stand in his shop, and had the order ready at once.

Before she could leave, he called out, “Are you sure that’s it?”, and Mary gave a curt nod and said yes. She took the shopping bag, and went to leave the shop, still remembering his even less appealing moods. And just as she was at the doors, she said a very quick, “Thank you for shopping with me, dear”, right when she was leaving from the butcher’s earshot.

"Bert", she began, turning the locket over in her hands, first face up, then down, "you told me early this morning that you could let me know how the children I leave are doing. Could you… could you tell me about the Banks Family?" She asked simply, as they made their way back through the winding streets to Mrs Alfred’s house.

Bert nodded at her before beginning to tell her of the Banks family. “Well their father and mother seem to ‘ave fallen in love all over again.” He smiled at the thought. “In fact they are expecting a baby, or twins from what the children tell me.” His voice grew soft yet serious. “They as about you all the time Mary. They always ask me if I know where you are, and if you’ll ever visit them, or if they’ll ever see you again.” He couldn’t quite read her expression for Mary was very skilled at hiding emotion. “They really love you Mary. And they knew you loved them like they were your own, they ‘aven’t forgotten you darling.” He reassured her. “Though their family is practically perfect as you left it, they all still love you.

20 hours ago   13   Reblog

when someone tells you you’re good at playing your character

image

21 hours ago   1034   Reblog
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